Late Harvest

rabbit-light:


after Rilke’s Herbsttag



Time, it is time.
Summer has been
long-stretched-out, full.
Go ahead, Fall:
shrink down the days
and sugar the grapes
for late-harvest wine.

Anyone still unknown
to herself will stay,
probably, that way.
Anyone unlinked by love
will be love-
left-out now—waking,
mind-pacing
up and down
up and down,
restless as leaf-bits
and papers in the street.

Jeredith Merrin

mildredsfierce:

"It was December 1944, and the Battle of the Bulge was raging across the Ardennes Forest of Nazi-occupied Belgium. A woman with a German accent, wearing an American soldier’s uniform, sat shivering in the snow in the midst of some American soldiers. German troops were moving in, closer and closer. She fingered the pistol in her pocket. She now had to face the thought she had been trying to avoid ever since she had come back to Europe: would the Germans find her, and if so, what would they do to her? Her name was Marlene Dietrich.

She had been born in Berlin, Germany, in 1901. As a young woman, she had become a stage entertainer and then a successful movie star, first in her native Germany and then in America. Her films were so popular in Germany that in 1937, Adolf Hitler (who owned a collection of her movies) sent personal messengers to Marlene to offer her a very rewarding movie career: she could be the ‘queen of German film’ if only she would return from the United States to Germany and make films for the Third Reich.

She told the messengers that she was currently under contract to make films in Hollywood with her longtime mentor, Jewish-German director Josef von Sternberg, but that she would gladly make a German film if he would be allowed to direct it. There was a tense silence. Marlene finally broke it. ‘Do I rightly understand,’ she asked, ‘that you refuse to have Mr. von Sternberg make a film in your country because he’s Jewish?’

The German messengers began to talk at once. They said that Marlene had been ‘infected’ with false American propoganda and that there was no anti-Semitism in Germany. Marlene knew better. Hitler had drastically altered the Germany of her youth…”

-Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue by Kathryn J. Atwood.

(via celluloidseance)

sica49:

"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.

He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!

Teach the babies that their words matter yess

(via misandry-mermaid)

xylark:

When you put it on it’s an invitation,
When they play your the song, get on up and shake it,
Work it out on your man you don’t have to waste it,
Spin it all around then take it to the ground

Cause when he acts wrong, that’s when you put it on,
Been on him up tight, this is your song
Hold out your back, time to impress
Pull out your freakum dress

blastedheath:

Francis Picabia (French, 1879-1953), Lano, c.1937-38. Gouache and oil on board, 54.8 x 46.1 cm.

man-in-space:

Cahill Butterfly Map" (Bernard J.S. Cahill, 1919). Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

metidation:

r u ever like damn i hate my body but then ur like life is an illusion i’m floatin around on a rock trapped in an orbit around a ball of flame in a vast & largely unknown universe where death is unescapable who gives a shit ???

(via aubreyludgate)

tomkirk:

my life is just a collection of poorly made decisions with alternative music playing in the background

(via buttcardigans)